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PIE Blog — Social Justice

4 Ways to Practice Allyship for Racial Justice

4 Ways to Practice Allyship for Racial Justice

Racial tension, civil unrest, and systemic injustice impact us in different ways. For some people, the highlighted inequities give further proof to their lived experiences, and move them to speak out and take action for justice. For others, it opens their eyes to now see the racial injustices that their privilege once allowed them to ignore.  If you’re in the latter group, you may be looking for ways to stand in solidarity with communities of color. While this process is a lifelong journey, and there are many ways to continuously learn, grow, and hold yourself accountable, here are four tangible...


Thank You, Stacey Abrams.

Thank You, Stacey Abrams.

While the outcome of this election is still to be determined, one thing is for certain: Black Women Save the Day Every Day (shop Black Women Save the Day apparel). Stacey Abrams has proven this, again.

By now, you've likely seen Stacey Abrams' name and photos all over your timeline. Here at PIE, we join in appreciating this queen, and we want to be sure we all understand exactly what Stacey has done.


How long will we talk about race? Until we can breathe.

How long will we talk about race? Until we can breathe.

Some people are “sick” of the protests.
“Sick” of talking about race. 
“Sick” of us making our case.
You say you’re sick. 
Imagine how sick we are. 

Black on Black Crime is a Myth

Black on Black Crime is a Myth

Statistics tell us that the majority of crimes are intraracial— meaning that the person who committed the crime and the victim of the crime are typically of the same race. This is the case for ALL races. But have you ever heard anyone talk about “white-on-white crime” or “latinx-on-lantinx crime”? Probably not. ⁣